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H2Odata.city


improving local water infrastructure monitoring and maintenance capacity

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H2Odata.city


improving local water infrastructure monitoring and maintenance capacity

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a water infrastructure sustainability project to improve local water infrastructure monitoring and maintenance capacity through the training and responsibilization of water infrastructure maintenance entities.

Context


program justification

Context


program justification

According to the IMF, Burkina Faso has one of the lowest per capita supplies of water in the world [1].  To address this problem, various actors in the water sector have installed thousands of water points across the country in the last few decades. Today, however, over 20% of these installed water points have been found to be non-functional [2].  This can be attributed to three crucial factors:

  1. Water actors have an incomplete picture of drinking water infrastructure and services in Burkinabè cities.  This prevents water actors from strategically using water data to inform repair and expansion efforts, meaning that available resources are not being targeted to the areas in greatest need.
  2. Water point monitoring and maintenance roles are often not clearly defined. Water point maintenance entities, namely Water Point Committees (WPCs), have either not been appointed clearly or not at all. WPCs are the sectoral standard maintenance entity for assurance of water point longevity and sustainability.

  3. There is no Standard Operating Procedure in place for response to a water point breakdown.  Even when monitoring and maintenance roles have been defined, there isn't a strategy for repairing the water pont when it breaks.

As a result of these shortcomings, when water points fall into disrepair, they typically remain non-functional for upwards of 4 weeks [3].  During this time, the population is forced to turn to alternate, often unsafe water points for their water needs. The use of these alternate water points leads to the spread of water-borne diseases like diarrhea, and the reallocation of time by women and children previously dedicated to education or income-generating activities.  As such, improper monitoring and maintenance of water infrastructure and services is not just a question water, but also of health, economy, education, women, and youth.

Program


H2Odata.city

Program


H2Odata.city

H2Odata.city is a water infrastructure sustainability program to improve local water infrastructure monitoring and maintenance capacity through the training and responsibilization of water infrastructure maintenance entities.  It is implemented in three principal phases:

 
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Phase 1:  Water data acquisition

Activities:

  1. Collect water point data for all public water points using open source survey tool Kobo Toolbox. Water point data collected includes: GPS coordinates, type of water point, functionality status, status of WPC, among others. 
  2. Coordinate with project partners to acquire existing water infrastructure data for comparison.
     
 
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Phase 2:  Water infrastructure maintenance entity creation and/or fortification

Activities:

  1. Using data collected in Phase 1, determine water points requiring a) full WPC establishment, b) partial WPC fortification, or c) no action at all based on an evaluation rubric.
  2. For water points determined to need full WPC establishment, implicate and organize users of the water point into a WPC structure following USAID WA-WASH's protocol for WPC establishment [4] via a 3-day workshop.
  3. For water points determined to need partial WPC fortification, arrange a 3-day workshop for the existent WPC to mirror structures and practices employed in USAID WA-WASH's protocol for WPC establishment [4].
     
 
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Phase 3:  Water infrastructure repair standard operating procedure creation and/or fortification

Activities:

  1. After having installed the required WPCs, we will use collected data from Phase 1 to determine water points requiring a) full SOP establishment, b) partial SOP fortification, or c) no action at all based on an evaluation rubric.
  2. For water points determined to need full SOP establishment, arrange a 2-day workshop for the WPC to introduce Initiative: Eau's SMS-based water point failure reporting system. For water points which require full or partial WPC establishment/fortification, SOP establishment will be included in the workshops of Phase 2.
  3. For water points determined to need full SOP establishment, arrange a 2-day workshop for the WPC to introduce Initiative: Eau's SMS-based water point failure reporting system.

Objectives


program goals

Objectives


program goals

 
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understand the state of water infrastructure in a city at the level functionality, quality, and reliability

 
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fortify and when necessary establish water point maintenance committees

 
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fortify and when necessary establish standard operating procedures for water point repair

Implementations


active instances of H2Odata.city

Implementations


active instances of H2Odata.city

Click the map points for more detailed information about each H2Odata.city implementation, including:

  • Status
  • Implementing partners
  • Timeline
  • Budget
  • Cost per beneficiary

References


References


[1]  International Monetary Fund. (2015). Issues in Managing Water Challenges and Policy Instruments: Regional Perspectives and Case Studies. Accessed 03 January 2018, from https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/sdn/2015/sdn1511tn.pdf.

[2]  Rural Water Supply Network.  (2016). What's working, Where, and for How Long: A 2016 Water Point Update.  Accessed 03 January 2018, http://www.rural-water-supply.net/_ressources/documents/default/1-787-2-1502962732.pdf.

[3]  Initiative: Eau. (2015). WASHMobile Program Brief.  Internal document (available on request).

[4]  United States Agency for International Development. (2016). USAID West Africa Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene Program (USAID WA-WASH) - USAID WA-WASH FINAL REPORT.  Retrieved 03 January 2018, from http://pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PA00KWMW.pdf.